Daikon Radish

By November 1, 2019Daikon Radish

Daikon radish is Japanese in origin and a member of the Brassica family along with broccoli, cabbage, and brussel sprouts to name a few.  The daikon radish is mild tasting and very versatile equally delicious raw or cooked!  It adds a refreshing crunch and doesn’t have a strong flavor to compete with other ingredients in a recipe.  The daikon radish has thin skin and can be peeled or not, your preference.  It is crisp and easy to cut in a variety of ways depending on how the radish is to be used.  

Storage:  The daikon radish is a bit more perishable than other radish.  Trim off any greens then cut the radish you received in pieces that will fit in a storage bag.  Wrap each piece in a paper towel,and place in an open plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator.  .The radish should last up to 10 days.    


Freezing:  Yes, daikon can be frozen.  Blanche first for best results.  
https://fruitsandveggies.org/expert-advice/can-freeze-daikon-radishes/
The daikon can then be used in soups,curries and stirfries over the winter.  

Shred:  To be used in slaws, salads or to put in a brine to pickle with shredded carrots.  This is a yummy addition to a grain or noodle bowl or topping for a pulled pork or chicken sandwich.*note- shredding allows the veggies to absorb the flavor quicker- for longer refrigerator storage cut into small sticks or thin slices.
https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/02/pickled-daikon-and-carrot-do-chua.html

Once the daikon and carrots are pickled, tossing some shredded pear with it before topping a salad or sandwich is quite tasty.
Matchsticks: Great in all of the above as well as in fresh spring rolls.  These take a little longer but so many parts of the recipe can be prepped ahead.  This is a great clean out the crisper recipe as well.  Leftover chicken,turkey or pork? Leftover lettuce, cabbage, cucumber or baby spinach? Use it up. Because these are eaten raw, the ingredients being cut to a similar size is important.  Not a fan of peanut sauce?  Experiment or use your favorite dressing.  This is essentially a salad in rice paper.
https://www.feastingathome.com/spring-rolls/

Cooked Daikon:  Baked daikon radish fries are amazing.  Not quite french fries but delicious!
https://cookingontheweekends.com/spicy-roasted-daikon-french-fry-recipe/
Soup season is beginning:
https://www.finecooking.com/recipe/asian-chicken-daikon-radish-soup


Pickling:  Even if you are not a pickle lover, doing a refrigerator pickle with daikon and carrots is one of the easiest preservation methods.  Shred, slice or cut the vegetables into matchsticks. These pickled gems can then be added to so many recipes throughout the season.  Finally chop them and add to vegetable salads, chicken salad and to top braised beef sandwiches, and pulled pork and chicken.  Not fond of that pickle twang?  Make a vinaigrette that is on the sweeter side with honey and citrus.  Rinse off the brine and add the daikon and carrot.  This will mellow out the twang before using.

https://mykoreankitchen.com/pickled-carrots-and-daikon-radish/

Recipes:Shredded Daikon is great alongside shredded carrot or chopped broccoli in veggie tots or fritters.  
https://www.justataste.com/quick-and-crispy-vegetable-fritters-recipe/

Veggie noodles – absolutely!
https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/daikon-fettuccine-with-tomato-basil-sauce-recipe-2011757

Do you love curry?:
https://www.justapinch.com/recipes/side/side-vegetable/roasted-curry-daikon-radish.html
Use sliced daikon radish as a cracker with dips.  This buffalo chicken dip with daikon crackers was a hit during the football game:

https://www.thechunkychef.com/slow-cooker-buffalo-chicken-dip-recipe/

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